12 Substitutes For Oats In A Smoothie (That Taste Great)


Hearty oats thicken smoothies while adding nutrition and keeping a person full for longer. But you might not always have oats in the cupboard and sometimes they don’t agree with everyone. I love raw oats in smoothies but it’s good to mix it up every now and then. So, what’s a healthy alternative to oats in smoothies that will keep stomachs satisfied?

Excellent oat alternatives for smoothies:

  1. Amaranth
  2. Buckwheat
  3. Chia Seeds
  4. Ground Almonds
  5. Brown Rice
  6. Millet
  7. Oat Bran
  8. Quinoa
  9. Spelt
  10. Teff
  11. Wheat Berries
  12. Wheat Germ

An ideal substitute for oats in a smoothie must add thickness while also being nutritious and filling. The oat substitute must also add a light, subtle, and pleasing flavor.

People eat smoothies for all sorts of reasons: weight loss, transportability, bodybuilding, a nutritious snack, or simply because they taste good. Therefore an ingredient substitute must respect the different nutrient needs of different people: low-carb, low-calorie, or higher in protein for example.

But whatever your reason for needing an oatmeal substitute, one of this twelve should work for you. 

1. Amaranth

Amaranth is a seed that is treated like a grain. It has an earthy and nutty flavor and can make an excellent thickener to smoothies if used in its flour form. However, it is best to boil it if you use the whole seeds. Amaranth is a great source of iron, potassium, calcium, and selenium.

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 374
  • Fat: 6.5 g
  • Protein: 14.45 g
  • Carbs: 66. 2 g
  • Fiber: 9.3 g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Strawberry Banana Amaranth Smoothie

2. Buckwheat

Contrary to its name, buckwheat is a seed, not wheat. It is high in antioxidants and minerals such as manganese, copper, magnesium, iron, and phosphorus. It is easier to use in a smoothie if cooked first.

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 343
  • Fat: 3.4 g
  • Protein: 13.25 g
  • Carbs: 71.5 g
  • Fiber: 10g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes 
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Buckwheat Smoothie With Honey And Cinnamon

Cinnamon and buckwheat Smoothie

3. Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are an excellent addition to smoothies in order to stave off hunger. However, if you want to use them as a thickener, you need to soak them first. The seeds are not a good source of vitamins, but they make up for that in their mineral content: manganese, phosphorus, copper, selenium, iron, calcium, and magnesium. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 490
  • Fat: 30.7 g
  • Protein: 15.62 g
  • Carbs: 43.85 g
  • Fiber: 37.7 g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Blueberry Chia Seed Smoothie

4. Ground Almonds

Ground almonds or almond flour add a real nutty flavor and act as a thickener. The nuts are an excellent source of calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, and vitamin E. They are also highly recommended for controlling hunger, making them a perfect addition to smoothies that lack filling substance. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 578
  • Fat: 50.64 g
  • Protein: 21.26 g
  • Carbs: 18.7 g
  • Fiber: 11.8
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Epic Almond Smoothie

5. Brown Rice

Brown rice is the more nutritious parent of white rice and has a slightly nutty flavor and can be added to smoothies as flour or cooked grain. The grain is a good source of thiamin, niacin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium.

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 110
  • Fat: .9 g
  • Protein: 2.5 g
  • Carbs: 22.8 g
  • Fiber: 1.8 g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: yes

Try this recipe – Date Smoothie With Brown Rice And Almond Milk

6. Millet

Millet is often recommended as an oatmeal alternative for those who can’t eat oats. As a flour, it can be added directly to a smoothy or give the grain a light cook. Millet has more calcium than any other cereal grain and is a good source of amino acids, phosphorus, magnesium, folate, and iron. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 378
  • Fat: 4.22
  • Protein: 11.02 g
  • Carbs: 72.8 g
  • Fiber: 8.5 g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Strawberry, Millet, and Banana Smoothie

7. Oat Bran

Oat bran is the skin of the grain after it has been processed and makes a nice thickener for smoothies while adding nutrition. It is an excellent source of antioxidants, soluble fiber, insoluble fiber, thiamine, magnesium, phosphorus, and iron. Bonus: you don’t have to cook it before tossing it into the blender. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 246
  • Fat: 7.03 g
  • Protein: 17.3 g
  • Carbs: 66.22 g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes (but it can be easily contaminated, so look for labeled gluten-free varieties) 
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Banana Oat Bran Smoothie

8. Quinoa

Quinoa is a health food darling because it contains the nine essential amino acids, including lysine. It is typically used as a grain, much like rice or couscous. However, it is actually a seed. It is best added cooked. However, toasting it lightly before boiling it will add an extra flavorful touch to your smoothie. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 374
  • Fat: 5.8 g
  • Protein: 13.1
  • Carbs: 68.9
  • Fiber: 5.9g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: Yes

Try this recipe – Rasberry Quinoa Smoothie

9. Spelt

Spelt is an ancient grain that possesses a slightly sweet and nutty flavor. Thus, it can add some subtle taste to a smoothy without causing havoc for somebody with a groundnut allergy. The flour and flakes can be added raw, but the whole grain might work best if cooked first or soaked. The nutritious grain is high in manganese and a good source of phosphorous, niacin, magnesium, zinc, and iron. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 127
  • Fat: .9 g
  • Protein: 5.5 g
  • Carbs: 26 g
  • Fiber: 2.9
  • Gluten-Free: No
  • Low FODMAP: Yes, if the flour, no, if the whole grain

Try this recipe – Peach, Spelt, and Agave Smoothie

10. Teff

Teff is a gluten-free grain making it an excellent choice for those with Celiac disease. This oat alternative has a mild nutty taste and is high in iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc. You can add it to your smoothies raw, but it is far better if it is soaked for 24 hours or cooked. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 367
  • Fat: 2.4 g
  • Protein: 13 g
  • Carbs: 73 g
  • Fiber: 8 g
  • Gluten-Free: Yes
  • Low FODMAP: No

Try this recipe – Banana, Nut, and Teff Smoothie

11. Wheat Berries

Wheat Berries are a chewy, whole kernel, so it has been minimally processed. They can be thrown into a smoothy raw, soaked, or boil them for an hour before tossing them in. They are packed with vitamin E, and B-complex and are a good source of iron, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, niacin, thiamin, and calcium. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 354
  • Fat: 3.12
  • Protein: 18.75 g
  • Carbs: 66.67 g
  • Fiber: 8.3 g
  • Gluten-Free: No
  • Low FODMAP: No

12. Wheat Germ

Wheat Germ was the superfood of the ’70s. But you don’t have to be wearing bellbottoms and sport a Farrah Fawcett haircut to take advantage of this oat substitute. You only need a few tablespoons to work as a thickener. Bonus: no cooking required. It is also high in many vitamins and minerals, including iron, vitamin B6, manganese, selenium, zinc, phosphorus, and thiamine. 

Per 100 grams:

  • Calories: 360
  • Fat: 9.72 g
  • Protein: 23.15 g
  • Carbs: 51.8g
  • Fiber: 12 g
  • Gluten-Free: No
  • Low FODMAP: No

Try this recipe – Wheat Germ And Berry Smoothie

What Should You Not Mix In A Smoothie?

Some ingredients are low in nutrition, leave you hungry, or are high in unhelpful calories. Smoothies should be a delicious, nutritious punch, not a liquid candy bar. Here are 7 things to keep out of your smoothie:

  1. Agave Nectar
  2. Artificial sweeteners
  3. Canned fruit
  4. Coconut nectar
  5. Flavored fat-free yogurts
  6. Fruit juice
  7. Ice cream or frozen yogurt

Conclusion

Our twelve oat substitutes are all healthy and excellent options. Give them a try, even if you have oats around. Variety keeps the diet rounded and your smoothies from becoming dull. 

Tom

Hey, I'm Tom. I set up Boss The Kitchen to start answering the thousands of questions people have while cooking. For me, the kitchen is my happy place and I hope to help other people with the knowledge I've gained along the way.

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